Nightmares are common but underreported in US military personnel

A new study shows that a high percentage of military personnel with sleep disturbances met criteria for nightmare disorder, but few of them reported nightmares as a reason for sleep evaluation. Those with nightmare disorder had an increased risk of other sleep and mental health disorders.

Results show that 31 percent of military participants had clinically significant nightmares, and trauma-related nightmares occurred in 60 percent of them. Participants who met criteria for nightmare disorder were five times more likely to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), four times more likely to have depression, three times more likely to have anxiety, and two times more likely to have insomnia. Despite their common presence, nightmares were reported as a sleep-related concern by only 3.9 percent of military personnel.

“This research provides a basis for furthering the study and knowledge of nightmares in survivors of traumatic experiences,” said principal investigator Dr. Jennifer Creamer, medical director of the Sleep Medicine Center at Martin Army Medical Center in Fort Benning, Georgia. “Treatment of nightmares can lead to improvement in sleep, quality of life, and other disorders such as suicidality.”

Full story at Science Daily