ADHD medications may reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infection

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increases the risk of subsequent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among adolescent and young adult populations by about three times, reports a study published in the January 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

The authors also found that short- and long-term use of ADHD medication reduced the risk of subsequent STIs among men by 30% and 41%, respectively.

“ADHD is the most common neurodevelopmental disorder, and affects approximately 5%-7% of children and adolescents and 2% of young adults,” said lead author Mu-Hong Chen, MD, a physician at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital and the College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei. “Increasing evidence supports an association between ADHD and various health-risk behaviors, such as risky driving, substance abuse, and risky sexual behaviors. Clinical psychiatrists [should] focus on the occurrence of risky sexual behaviors and the risk of STIs among patients with ADHD, and emphasize that treatment with ADHD medications may be a protective factor for prevention of STIs.”

Full story at Science Daily

Low maternal thyroid hormone during pregnancy increases risk for schizophrenia in offspring

A study published in Biological Psychiatry reveals a new link between low levels of the thyroid hormone thyroxine during pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in the offspring.

Low levels of free thyroxine in pregnant women, referred to as hypothyroxinemia, are associated with abnormalities in cognitive development similar to those in schizophrenia, a neurodevelopmental disorder. Hypothyroxinemia is also associated with preterm birth, a risk factor for schizophrenia.

To determine if hypothyroxinemia is associated with schizophrenia, the study, led by senior author Dr. Alan Brown, Professor of Psychiatry Epidemiology at Columbia University Medical Center, the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, examined thyroxine levels in archived serum samples from 1010 mothers of children with schizophrenia and 1010 matched control mothers. The sera were collected during the first and early second trimesters of pregnancy as part of the Finnish Maternity Cohort. Comprehensive Finnish registries of the population and psychiatric diagnoses provided information on case status (schizophrenia or control) among offspring of mothers corresponding to the prenatal serum samples.

Full story of thyroid hormone during pregnancy and risk of schizoplrenia at Science Daily