Psychologist CEUs

47 Louisiana long-term care sites seen as virus ‘clusters’

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — As coronavirus cases spike ever higher in Louisiana, the state’s nursing homes, assisted living sites and adult residential care facilities are showing more and more “clusters” of the virus, but the full scale of the outbreak at those sites remains uncertain. Louisiana’s Department of Health has identified 47 long-term care facilities that it considers a cluster, with at least two apparently related cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. That number has…

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Buyers Beware: Scammers on the Move During COVID-19 Pandemic

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the FBI has issued a warning to health-care professionals to beware of fraudsters trying to sell them fake COVID-19 equipment. Other scams across the nation revolving around the virus are cropping up as well. “Be aware that criminals are attempting to exploit COVID-19 worldwide through a variety of scams,” the FBI wrote on its site. The FBI has received reports of individuals and businesses selling fake COVID-19 cures online and phishing emails that pose as the World Health…

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Fast-Fail Trial Shows New Approach to Identifying Brain Targets for Clinical Treatments

A first-of-its-kind trial has demonstrated that a receptor involved in the brain’s reward system may be a viable target for treating anhedonia (or lack of pleasure), a key symptom of several mood and anxiety disorders. This innovative fast-fail trial was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the results of the trial are published in Nature Medicine. Mood and anxiety disorders are some of the most…

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How Racial Minorities View Interracial Couples

In 1958, Richard Loving, a White man, and his wife Mildred, a Black woman, were arrested for the crime of being married. Although the couple had been legally wed in the District of Columbia, they became outlaws when they moved to Virginia, where interracial marriages were then illegal. This incident eventually led the 1967 landmark case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down laws banning interracial marriages. Today, about 12% of American couples…

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Loss of Smell or Taste Could Be a Symptom of COVID-19

Recognized symptoms of the novel coronavirus include fever, cough, and shortness of breath, but ear, nose, and throat specialists are calling on public health authorities to acknowledge another symptom: changes in the senses of smell or taste. In a press release, Claire Hopkins, President of the British Rhinological Society, and Nirmal Kumar, President of ENT UK, suggested that patients whose only symptom is a diminished or lost sense of smell “may be some of the hitherto hidden carriers that…

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How to Stop Touching Your Face

In this era of COVID-19 you have a hard time avoiding advice about washing your hands frequently and avoiding touching your face. As a public health matter, it is clearly good advice. I’m all for both of these things. As a psychologist, however, I can tell you that “good advice” is one of the weakest forms of behavior change known to science. Any parent reading this blog realizes that, of course. Let me reconfirm the obvious: just…

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The Counseling Connoisseur: How to talk to children about the coronavirus

The novel coronavirus, which causes the respiratory disease COVID-19, has made headlines for several weeks and has drastically impacted life as we know it. The outbreak, which the World Health Organization recently labeled a pandemic, has disrupted global commerce, shaken the United States stock market and led to travel restrictions and international border closures. Here in the United States, in an attempt to slow the coronavirus spread, major events have been canceled, educational systems are…

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Why Some People Prepare for COVID-19 and Some Don’t

If you’re reading this article, chances are you’re taking the coronavirus pandemic seriously. But, how much are others actually taking steps to limit the spread of the virus versus blithely continuing their lives as usual? And what’s the difference between people who take such steps and those who don’t? If all the fear isn’t enough to motivate people, what is? It’s hard to believe that less than two weeks ago the World Health Organization officially pronounced the novel coronavirus…

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Can Your Relationship Survive Too Much Togetherness?

The spread of the novel coronavirus is placing novel challenges on couples, families, roommates, and anyone who lives within the same four walls with more than one other person. Working from home, social distancing, isolation, and shelter-in-place orders mean that people who only spent evenings and weekends together are now in more or less constant contact. Although there may have been many times in your life when you wished you could spend more time with those you…

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White House Calls for AI Experts to Help COVID-19 Research

On March 16, 2020, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) announced the availability of an open research dataset on COVID-19, as well as stated a call to action for the nation’s artificial intelligence (AI) researchers to help scientists fight the disease. Established in 1976, the OSTP provides scientific and technological advice to the President and the Executive Office, among other duties. The CORD-19 (COVID-19 Open Research Dataset) is the result of a collaboration between the Allen Institute for…

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