Review of ADHD drug approvals highlights gaps between approval process, long-term safety assessment

Over the last 60 years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved 20 medications for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) based on clinical trials that were not designed to study their long-term efficacy and safety or to detect rare adverse events, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital report today in PLOS ONE. The study highlights gaps in how the long-term safety of drugs intended for chronic use in children is assessed as part of the FDA approval process.

“This study doesn’t address whether ADHD drugs are safe, though their safety has since been established through years of clinical experience,” says study senior author Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, Boston Children’s chair in biomedical informatics and population health and director of the Intelligent Health Laboratory in Boston Children’s Informatics Program. “Instead, we point to the need for an agenda emphasizing improved assessment of rare adverse events and long-term safety through post-marketing trials, comparative effectiveness trials and more active FDA enforcement.”