stress

Coping with the Holidays Survival Guide

For many people, Christmas and the holiday season are a happy and joyous time, enriched by reuniting with family and friends. But year’s end can also be very stressful. Old patterns of behavior emerge, our stress levels rise, and our ability to cope can really be tested. People with unsupportive parents or problematic family members face a whole different set of challenges. No sooner than we have put away the Thanksgiving tableware and decorations, we…

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How playing in a brass band could give your health a boost

New research from the United Kingdom suggests that people who play in a brass band experience a wide array of mental and physical health benefits — partly from playing an instrument, and, in part, thanks to the feeling of inclusion in a group. A large number of recent studies have shown that listening to music can help improve a person’s cognitive and physical health, as well as increase their resilience to stress. According to research Medical News…

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Firefighters can ease one another’s job stress, but loving spouses may increase it

Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress — but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study. For firefighters — 90% percent of whom are males — the desire to protect wives from awareness of the risks and emotional trauma of their jobs can add apprehension to their already considerable burden, said lead author Mark T. Morman,…

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How is stress linked with constipation?

High levels of stress can cause or aggravate gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea, stomach pain, and changes in bowel movements, which can include constipation. Researchers have identified various connections between the brain and stomach that may lead to constipation symptoms. A range of treatments and remedies can help relieve stress-related constipation. In this article, we cover some of the possible links between stress and constipation, along with potential treatments. Full story at Medical News Today

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Health care, mass shootings, 2020 election causing Americans significant stress

A year before the 2020 presidential election, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, mass shootings and the upcoming election, according to this year’s Stress in America™ survey by the American Psychological Association (APA). More than half of U.S. adults (56%) identify the 2020 presidential election as a significant stressor, an increase from the 52% of adults who reported the presidential election as a significant source of…

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What is trichotillomania?

Trichotillomania, or pathological hair pulling, is a common but underdiagnosed psychological disorder. People with trichotillomania experience an overwhelming urge to pull out their hair. Many people who have trichotillomania may not know that they have a diagnosable condition. They may simply view their hair pulling as a bad habit. Others may experience severe physical and psychological symptoms. This article outlines the symptoms and causes of trichotillomania, as well as the different treatment options available. Full…

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Social activity in your 60s may lower dementia risk by 12%

New research over a 28-year follow-up period finds significant evidence that frequent social contact at the age of 60 can lower the risk of developing dementia later on. The link between having a rich social life and brain health has received much attention in the scientific community. Some studies have suggested that levels of social interaction can predict cognitive decline and even dementia, while others have shown that group socializing can prevent the harmful effects of aging…

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Stressed at school? Art therapy reduces teenage girls’ headaches

Teenagers report higher levels of stress than adults, and cite school as the highest contributing factor, according to the American Psychological Association’s annual report. A summary from 2013 concluded that while stress among Americans was not new, “what’s troubling is the stress outlook for teens in the United States.” In response, recently some schools have turned to mindfulness-based programs as a way to alleviate stress among their students. These programs could benefit from more research…

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What is learned helplessness?

Learned helplessness is a state that occurs after a person has experienced a stressful situation repeatedly. They come to believe that they are unable to control or change the situation, so they do not try — even when opportunities for change become available. Psychologists first described learned helplessness in 1967 after a series of experiments in animals, and they suggested that their findings could apply to humans. Learned helplessness leads to increased feelings of stress and depression. For…

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Simple test can tell if you’re stressed out

Stress is often called “the silent killer” because of its stealthy and mysterious effects on everything from heart disease to mental health. Now researchers at the University of Cincinnati have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva. Eventually, they hope to turn their ideas into a simple device that patients can use at home to monitor their health. The results were published this…

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